Bike to Work Week 2014

Bike to Work Week is May 8 through the 16th in the La Crosse area this year.
It is your excuse to try bicycle commuting.
We have lots of fun (and free!) things to do this week to encourage everyone to give it a try. If you can only manage National Bike to Work Day on Friday, awesome, but you will miss some neat stuff we planned for you this year!

The quick list of events in the Driftless Region:

Thurs-La Crosse-Hamilton School Bike Rodeo-5-6:30PM

Friday-Repair Cafe’ will be at Cameron Park during the Farmers Market for quick (free labor) bike tune-ups.

Sat thru Fri- Bike to Coffee (FREE COFFEE!)

Sat-La Crosse-Vintage Ride-Wine Guyz-4PPM Bring your old single, 3, 10 or 12 speed bikes for ride.

Sat & Sun-Bike to Worship

Sun-La Crosse- Mother of all Bike Rides-Riverside Park, International Gardens-9AM Round trip ride to Onalaska for a light breakfast.

Mon- Two Group rides: Onalaska-Blue Heron Bike Shop-6PM and at La Crescent-Old Hickory Park-6:30PM

Tue-Onalaska-Breakfast at ‘The Y’ 6:30-8AM

Tue-South Side Library-Bike Decorating and Parade-4PM

Wed-La Crosse-Breakfast at ‘The Y’ 6:30-8AM

Wed-Holmen-Bike Rodeo-4:30PM

Wed-’Free Wheelin’ Wednsday’ at the Pearl Street Brewery (FREE BEER!)-4 til 8PM

Thurs-Tour de Java morning ride (meet at Moka)-6AM

Thurs-Ride with Cops Family Ride-Cameron Park-6PM

Thurs-La Crosse- ‘The Y’-(18+) Go By Bike Class-6:30PM

Fri-Cameron Park-Closing Ceremony-5-7PM Music provided by ‘Grand Picnic’

Sat-Westby-Syttende Mai Tour-8AM

Sat-Onalaska-’The Y’ Family Bike Class, ages 9+ with parent-10AM

Sat-La Crescent-Apple Blossom Bike Tour

Saturday, May 31-La Crosse-’The Y’ Family Bike class, ages 9+ with parent-10AM

There are more details on the Driftless Region Bicycle Coalition BTWW webpage:
Full event list

There are several pdf’s to print out so you don’t miss a thing!

Send questions to:
info@driftlessbicycle.org

Why park the car at home?

I get asked, “Why would I want to ride my bike to work? I have a car?” I query back, “Would you like to have more money in your pocket?” “Would you like to feel happier when you arrive at your destination?” “How about getting the great parking spots near the door?” Bike to Work Week is there to help you have an excuse to try it out.

-The average cost of a car in the US is almost $10,000 a year! Think of having an extra $190 ‘every week’ in your pocket! Simple, use another method of transporting yourself. Riding a bike is fast and efficient transportation.

-Even a short 1 or 2 mile ride does wonders for your health. Gets your blood moving and fresh air in your lungs. When you arrive and park the bike (near the door!), your body has the energy rolling and ready to use.

-Bike racks are usually closest to the doors just about everywhere. I park my bike in the garage at work, even the boss doesn’t get to park his private car in the garage.

-When you get the question on why you rode your bike, just say, “It’s Bike to Work Week” . Then when you decide to keep riding, let them know you found riding to work better that week and decided to keep doing it.

You have the perfect excuse to try riding to work.
You have a reason to do it ($$).
You have someone who will help you (us at DRBC).

Join us. Ride to work during this years Bike to Work Week.

Looking forward to seeing you at the events,

Michael Baker
President, Driftless Region Bicycle Coalition

I would like to add extra special thanks to the DRBC BTWW Committee, everyone really did a great job! Thank you.

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Finally, non Subzero weather

The elation of not having to deal with riding in subzero weather is amazing, uplifting and very welcome.
It really isn’t hard to ride in below zero temperatures. Put some layers on and go.
My winter beater (named the ‘Wynott’) has been reliable all winter. More reliable than my summer bikes. No flats, no chain problems, no brake problems (no brakes), no gearing problems (1 gear) and only one day I had to walk the bike (1 block) because the snow on the road was impassable (I did slog my way about 10 blocks before just not being able to find a track). Not bad for my 5 miles per day commute plus 3-10 miles for entertainment rides (music and bar hopping mostly). I did have (normal?) saddle problems on longer rides (cheap saddle) and will skip the graphic description. Solved with bike shorts.
So, as one of the ‘extreme’ riders, I admit to a little hardship. I admit that riding year round takes effort. It just takes putting in your head that this is how you get around. I suppose the same thing could be used if you only had a horse for transportation. Think of the maintenance on that vehicle!
The big drive for me to use a bike as transportation is the money and time I save (yes, I said time). If I had a car, I figure I would have to work a second job to be able to spend money the way I do. Plus time and bloody knuckles fixing and maintaining a late model car (there goes my Saturday or Sunday afternoons). I have been there and done that on cars. We always had two. Now with just one, I keep it better maintained (I can afford to pay ‘the man’) and it lasts longer (this one is 10yrs old and will probably last 10 more).
I do seem to keep bring up the same thing when I write about bicycle commuting. Sorry, guess it emphasizes the truth of it. I admit to have an ‘ideal’ commute, but then, I live and work where I do on purpose. I chose a job near my home. I chose a home near the places I need and want to go to. Sometimes it takes time and planning, it did for me. Now I have it. If you want it, plan for it, execute the plan, then, enjoy the benefits. End bicycle commuting rant…;-)

Springtime is upon us. It will snow again, it’s still a bit chilly, but at least we can remove ‘Polar Vortex’ from everyday use.   

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Everyday Outdoors

February 4, 2014 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Commuting, DRBC, Events, Gear, How To, Lifestyle 

I live in Wisconsin. The weather changes. Duh. Nothing new, it’s everyday. We get melting heat in the hundreds with humidity that you can almost swim through. We get rain and storms that cause flooding (that you literally swim through) and we get cold. This year we seem to be getting plenty of that. Subzero temps have been the norm for weeks now. I seem to be one of a small group that has decided to simply deal with it. This group, by the way, is growing. We don extra layers, mittens, facemasks and goggles. The snow for skiing and snowshoeing is really good, the fat tire bike group has over a dozen riders each week, I see fellow bicycle commuters everyday. The city is doing their normal job on the streets and they are passable. I ride daily and haven’t had to deal with ‘too much snow to ride through’ yet. Outdoors in Wisconsin, in Winter, is still good, add a layer.
I was looking through my calendar and realized how much I do outside in the winter. I have been going out more lately as the temps dropped. Every night for almost a week I was getting home around Midnight. That’s not normal, guess there’s just too much fun stuff to do. Rode to PSB on Wednesday for a free pint, strapped the skis to the bike Thursday for ski night at the golf course, great music downtown Friday and Saturday night, Sunday, skied at the golf course early, then rode to a friends for the Superbowl, snowshoed for a couple hours with them before the game.
I find the key to everyday outdoors is stay warm and have some lighting. The skiers use strap on head lights to light the trail at night. Bikes of course have bike lights and reflective stuff. When the moon is out, snowshoeing by moon light is amazing. 
The cold is just cold, use what works. The darkness is defeated by simple cheap lighting. Friendship in the cold grows, the experience together is more intense. Enjoying a hot toddy or coffee afterwards just sounds good. Chatting about ‘the crazy headwind’ or how ‘noisy the snow is at this temperature’ becomes normal conversation. 
Don’t be afraid of the cold dark Winter, warm it with activity, friendship and fun. Before you know it, we’ll be swimming through the humidity of Summer…

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1-Winter cycling in Wisconsin

January 8, 2014 by · 1 Comment
Filed under: Advocacy, Commuting, Education, Gear, How To, Outreach 

I ride, a bicycle, in Wisconsin, year round…
In my discussions with cycling friends who only ride in fair weather, here is my conclusion. I will assume they are like other normal people and are a good sampling of the population.
They don’t ride in the winter because: It’s cold, and slippery, and cold. I did have a concern or two about their steeds and the salt, but mostly, it’s cold.
My answer is usually a question. You live in the midwest, it gets cold here, you don’t seem to suffer from bouts of hypothermia, how do you stay warm? And thus, I answer their biggest problem with riding in the winter.
Second big problem is usually the snow and ice on the roads. This is the more complicated answer, one most cyclists enjoy though. Buy stuff for your bike. This is a list of possibles:
Studded tires- they just work. Carbide studs last a long time. Tires are easy to change, most cyclists should know how to fix a flat.
Fenders- there are easy to put on fenders using rubber straps, some snap on to the frame or, have permanant ones put on. I reccomend having a shop put them on. They can be a pain to line up.
A bag- any bag you can carry an extra layer of clothing, batteries for lights (I assume you have them already) and other bits of bike nessessity. I use a Messenger bag but any backpack, bike trunk or pannier bag works. If you need water proof, use ziplock bags.
The big thing that I have added to my bike for cold weather riding are:  POGIES! – these are the big handlebar mitts. Every type I have tried are warm, some are not waterproof.  Everyone I know who has them becomes a winter rider. They range from $20 for ATV mitts to $100 for the super Alaskian type. I generalize extremely, just search for ‘bicycle bar mitts’ or ‘pogies’.
You don’t have to ride in the snow. The streets clear off a couple days after a snow and are quite passable. Riding in the snow can be challenging, expecially when there is loose snow to go through. Mostly, keep yourself kind of fluid and roll with it. Momentium will get you through, always ‘be ready’ for the bike to slip when going through the loose stuff or over ice if you don’t have studs.
Simple answer to riding in the winter, in Wisconsin. Wear warm, layers work best but, any warm will do.

Look for the next article: How I ride in the winter- The gear.

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2-Winter cycling in Wisconsin-The Gear

January 8, 2014 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Advocacy, Commuting, Gear, How To, Lifestyle 

I have seen cyclists use about anything when riding in the winter. Mountain bikes, cross bikes, old Schwinns, even skinny tire road bikes. They all work. Some are more adept to the road conditions. I think a low center of gravity is the less ‘skiddish’ an more enjoyable ride. I have a fixed gear bike that has a high center. I leave it hanging until the streets are dry. My steed of choice for any of my daily winter commuting is an old cheap mountain bike that is 3 sizes too small for me with studded tires…and a fixed gear rear wheel. I also don’t have brakes. I do take simplicity to a bit extreme this way, but then I also love fixed gear bikes. That’s another article…

So, let me start with clothing, then the bike and bits.
I ride daily, my commutes vary in time and length so I try to be ready and versatile. My 2 mile ride to work is less layered because my work uniform is not good cycling clothing and it is a pretty short ride. I mostly use rain pants and a warm layer coat and high viz shell coat, warm hat or balaclava (facemask), winter boots. I keep street shoes at the shop. The pogies allow for thin cheap gloves (the end stand, one size fits all type found in department stores). I’m thus ready for rain, wind and cold. Non work day riding finds me wearing more like the following.
image

So, (right to left in the picture) there is an underarmor type long sleeve, a thin wool sweater, thin down coat and  hi viz rain/wind coat. Jeans, wool socks, bike cap and helmet with the holes filled with foam I had left over from the extra pads. Sorell type boots. Rode all morning (about 30 miles with stops in between for errands), kept warm and was even getting a bit sweaty at 20°F. I add a thin layer like a long sleeve t-shirt over the first layer if the temp is below 10°F and have a thicker down coat for below zero. Usually the gloves and pogies are good to about zero, then I use ski type gloves.
Probably missed something, but you get the gist.
image

My bike is a custom beater built up on a department store mountain bike frame (named ‘Wynott’ as an opposite to my Wyatt fixed gear). I built up a 26″ fixed gear rear and have stainless chainring and cog. Not needed, just had them. Any drivetrain is good if it is kept lubed up. The seat is kept so my legs are flexed too much but I am close to the ground and more stable. Tires are 160 carbide stud tires. Carbide vs steel. In mixed riding (some exposed pavement, some packed snow and ice) go for the carbides. If you are riding on ice and packed snow, steel is less expensive and will work as well. The big key is maintenance. Either leave it frozen outside or bring it in and rinse it off with a pitcher of hot water to get the salt off. I do both, the water will cause you to need to lube the drivetrain more often. As you can see, Wynott is not fancy. Use any bike you have, but maintain it and it will serve you well in the cold and snow.

The bits. Platform pedals big enough to hold your snow boots. The pogies are hunters muffs. I got two and zip tied them to the handlebars. I have ATV mitts on a different bike. The fenders, front one is bolted on and has a DIY extension, the back fender is zip tied on. Lights of course. That about covers it.
On to the ride…

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